Tending my Trees

Article
by Morgan Smith, American Forest Foundation, and Lisa Hayden, New England Forestry Foundation

 

Your woods offer a variety of benefits including recreation, wildlife, family legacy, scenery, income, and more. Regardless of what value your woods provide, you likely love your woods and want to keep them healthy into the future.  
Article
by Kate MacFarland, Forest Service Assistant Agroforester

Across the US, communities are recognizing the importance of urban forests, community gardens, and other green space for residents’ mental and physical health, local and regional environmental benefits, and educational and nutritional opportunities. Food forests are an emerging form of green infrastructure that is becoming more and more common across the country.
Event
Tue, Oct 17, 2017 - 7:00 pm
until 9:00 pm
Location: Taste of India, 2570 Cleveland Ave., St. Paul (Roseville); 651-631-1222

Topics: MyMinnesotaWoods and UMN Master Woodland Owner Program: http://mwop.umn.edu/. The Master Woodland Owner program delivers a comprehensive training curriculum for private woodland owners interested in becoming better stewards of their woods. 

RSVP by October 16 to [email protected] 
Article
Many of us take family vacation in August. Some of us go to the beach while others prefer time in our woods. As you walk in your woods with your family, consider what do you love about your woods? Maybe it is a special grove of trees, the stream, a good bird watching/listening spot, or a tranquil spot. As you think of that special place, what do you want it to look like when your children or grandchildren inherit the land? A forester can help you write a forest management plan that meets your management goals and ensures your forest remains healthy.
Article
About 10 years ago, Indian Heights Park overrun with invasive plants while mountain bike tires were eroding the hillsides, park neighbors and Audubon members became concerned.  Many neighbors and community members enjoyed the park, but none of us really understood how valuable the land was to our history, culture and wildlife.  In 2010, we gathered the stakeholders together to share that this was (and is) an important site for Dakota people and that the city’s remnant oak savanna remains one of the most endangered ecosystem in Minnesota.
Article
The Okefenokee wildlife refuge wildfire is a good reminder that wildfires can happen anytime, anywhere. Normally spring rains keep the soils, plants and trees moist in this portion of northern Florida and southern Georgia. This year the springs rain did not come and the lack of precipitation allowed the woods to dry out. This, in turn, made the woods more prone to fire caused by a lightning strike.
Event
Sat, Apr 29, 2017 - 8:30 am
until 4:30 pm
Women and our Woods is teaming up with Women of the Maine Outdoors to offer an action-packed workshop for women woodland owners and outdoor enthusiasts! Join us Saturday, April 29 at Pine Tree Camp in Rome, Maine for engaging, hands-on classes in a variety of forest-based topics.
Event
Sat, Mar 18, 2017 - 9:00 am
until 4:00 pm
Full-day day class covers chainsaw basics
Article
A good aspen clear-cut mimics a natural disaster replacing an old stand with healthy seedlings. In the process it creates wildlife habitat for species that prefer young forests or the forests edge. Learn the key components of a successful regeneration cut.
Event
Sat, Dec 10, 2016 - 8:00 am
until 4:30 pm
“Harvest for Habitat” means thoughtfully and purposely harvesting trees in your woodlands to improve wildlife habitat. A well-planned tree harvest can improve the food and cover for specific wildlife by creating new growth and diversifying the ages, heights, and species of trees in your woodlands. Carefully planning which trees to harvest and retain can reap long-term habitat benefits beyond your own woodland.
Event
Wed, Oct 26, 2016 - 8:45 am
until 3:45 pm
Learn how to manage your woods to achieve your goals and objectives. Focus on forest health, growth and managing diverse trees.
Event
Fri, Sep 30, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 5:00 pm
Location: Clinton Town Hall, 8907 MN-37, Iron Junction, MN

Registration: $10/person. Contact East Range Joint Powers Board at [email protected] or call Cherie Grams at 218-229-3671 or 218-780-6144

Additional information: http://woodinnovation.umn.edu/news/forestry-field-day-coming-soon
Article
by Morgan Smith, American Forest Foundation, and Lisa Hayden, New England Forestry Foundation

 

Your woods offer a variety of benefits including recreation, wildlife, family legacy, scenery, income, and more. Regardless of what value your woods provide, you likely love your woods and want to keep them healthy into the future.  
Article
by Kate MacFarland, Forest Service Assistant Agroforester

Across the US, communities are recognizing the importance of urban forests, community gardens, and other green space for residents’ mental and physical health, local and regional environmental benefits, and educational and nutritional opportunities. Food forests are an emerging form of green infrastructure that is becoming more and more common across the country.
Event
Tue, Oct 17, 2017 - 7:00 pm
until 9:00 pm
Location: Taste of India, 2570 Cleveland Ave., St. Paul (Roseville); 651-631-1222

Topics: MyMinnesotaWoods and UMN Master Woodland Owner Program: http://mwop.umn.edu/. The Master Woodland Owner program delivers a comprehensive training curriculum for private woodland owners interested in becoming better stewards of their woods. 

RSVP by October 16 to [email protected] 
Article
Many of us take family vacation in August. Some of us go to the beach while others prefer time in our woods. As you walk in your woods with your family, consider what do you love about your woods? Maybe it is a special grove of trees, the stream, a good bird watching/listening spot, or a tranquil spot. As you think of that special place, what do you want it to look like when your children or grandchildren inherit the land? A forester can help you write a forest management plan that meets your management goals and ensures your forest remains healthy.
Article
About 10 years ago, Indian Heights Park overrun with invasive plants while mountain bike tires were eroding the hillsides, park neighbors and Audubon members became concerned.  Many neighbors and community members enjoyed the park, but none of us really understood how valuable the land was to our history, culture and wildlife.  In 2010, we gathered the stakeholders together to share that this was (and is) an important site for Dakota people and that the city’s remnant oak savanna remains one of the most endangered ecosystem in Minnesota.
Article
The Okefenokee wildlife refuge wildfire is a good reminder that wildfires can happen anytime, anywhere. Normally spring rains keep the soils, plants and trees moist in this portion of northern Florida and southern Georgia. This year the springs rain did not come and the lack of precipitation allowed the woods to dry out. This, in turn, made the woods more prone to fire caused by a lightning strike.