Northwest

Article
In the last 20 years, about one new species of beetle has landed on North American shores each year, imported from other parts of the world. The arrivals come mostly in wood pallets and other packing materials.
Article
Whether natural or man-made, fires have always had a hand in shaping the world’s forests.
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What can you do about it? The terms “resilient” has become a favorite of foresters looking to describe what our forests need to become in order to cope with the threat of drought and related stresses.
Event
Sat, Apr 27, 2019 - 1:00 pm
until 5:00 pm
Buds, flowers, and crisp young leaves are out! Let’s take some time to identify different species found in our native forest, and how to ethically and safely harvest these plants for our own larder. We’ll forage and prepare our findings for a wild lunch. This was a very successful workshop last Spring, and we’re at it again, come discover all the delicious offerings of Spring growth in the landscape.
Event
Sat, Mar 23, 2019 - 1:00 pm
until 5:00 pm
How many of us have planted new young species in our forest, only to discover them decimated within a few weeks by eager wildlife looking for food? There are ways to “fight back”, and the diverse solutions abound. Let’s look at some defensive strategies to keep wildlife out of young plantings. From wire mesh to mazes of deterrence, we’ll look at what’s working in the field and what has not, ideas to help you keep your young plantings alive and thriving as they establish on the landscape.

 
Article

Non-timber forest products can be a fun way to interact with your woodland in between forest harvests, or as an alternative management objective.


If you are interested in producing non-timber forest products, the best place to start is by taking an inventory of your property and skills.  
Article
Want to make your own maple syrup?
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Looking for a unique gift to bring to the hosts of your next holiday gathering? Or need something festive for your own table?

 
Article
Income Tax Deduction on Timber and Landscape Tree Loss from Casualty

Timber or landscape trees destroyed by the hurricane, fire, earthquake, ice, hail, tornado, and other storms are “casualty losses” that may allow the property owners to take a deduction on their federal income tax returns.
Article
Success looks like...
She had lost her husband two years before. He was always the one to do the forest management stuff while she managed horses! Now she was left without a clue of how she should manage the forest. Her plan was to just - let it be. Accompanying her friend who invited her on an informal Oregon WOWNet hike changed everything and left her in tears of relief. After talking with women on the hike who are managing forests on their own, she said she felt like she could do it too. She instantly felt she had a support network and a huge barrier was lifted. It’s amazing what a walk in the woods, with peers, can do!
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My mom called our forestland in northern Idaho a “spot of paradise.” Mom was the first to point out a grand fir that might fall, to see a moose on the pasture, and to notice Western larch needles changing color. She passed away eight years ago, and we try to honor her by caring for our forestland. Since my brother and I live far away, all of the work falls on Dad.
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Author:  Nicole Strong, Extension Forester, Deschutes/Crook/Jefferson/Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs

 
Article
In the last 20 years, about one new species of beetle has landed on North American shores each year, imported from other parts of the world. The arrivals come mostly in wood pallets and other packing materials.
Article
Whether natural or man-made, fires have always had a hand in shaping the world’s forests.
Article
What can you do about it? The terms “resilient” has become a favorite of foresters looking to describe what our forests need to become in order to cope with the threat of drought and related stresses.
Event
Sat, Apr 27, 2019 - 1:00 pm
until 5:00 pm
Buds, flowers, and crisp young leaves are out! Let’s take some time to identify different species found in our native forest, and how to ethically and safely harvest these plants for our own larder. We’ll forage and prepare our findings for a wild lunch. This was a very successful workshop last Spring, and we’re at it again, come discover all the delicious offerings of Spring growth in the landscape.
Event
Sat, Mar 23, 2019 - 1:00 pm
until 5:00 pm
How many of us have planted new young species in our forest, only to discover them decimated within a few weeks by eager wildlife looking for food? There are ways to “fight back”, and the diverse solutions abound. Let’s look at some defensive strategies to keep wildlife out of young plantings. From wire mesh to mazes of deterrence, we’ll look at what’s working in the field and what has not, ideas to help you keep your young plantings alive and thriving as they establish on the landscape.

 
Article

Non-timber forest products can be a fun way to interact with your woodland in between forest harvests, or as an alternative management objective.


If you are interested in producing non-timber forest products, the best place to start is by taking an inventory of your property and skills.