Northwest

Article
Income Tax Deduction on Timber and Landscape Tree Loss from Casualty

Timber or landscape trees destroyed by the hurricane, fire, earthquake, ice, hail, tornado, and other storms are “casualty losses” that may allow the property owners to take a deduction on their federal income tax returns.
Article
Success looks like...
She had lost her husband two years before. He was always the one to do the forest management stuff while she managed horses! Now she was left without a clue of how she should manage the forest. Her plan was to just - let it be. Accompanying her friend who invited her on an informal Oregon WOWNet hike changed everything and left her in tears of relief. After talking with women on the hike who are managing forests on their own, she said she felt like she could do it too. She instantly felt she had a support network and a huge barrier was lifted. It’s amazing what a walk in the woods, with peers, can do!
Article
My mom called our forestland in northern Idaho a “spot of paradise.” Mom was the first to point out a grand fir that might fall, to see a moose on the pasture, and to notice Western larch needles changing color. She passed away eight years ago, and we try to honor her by caring for our forestland. Since my brother and I live far away, all of the work falls on Dad.
Article
Author:  Nicole Strong, Extension Forester, Deschutes/Crook/Jefferson/Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs

 
Event
Sat, Apr 21, 2018 - 10:00 am
until 2:00 pm
Let's take a moment to deconstruct the green wall of vegetation which grows abundantly all around. What can you eat? What medicine grows right outside the front door? In the Spring, there are so many fresh young shoots and leaves to learn about in this afternoon of shared discovery; come take a walk and find a sweet or bitter snack!
Event
Sat, Mar 17, 2018 - 10:00 am
until 2:00 pm
“Who-ga-culture.”  Who the what?! German for "mound or hill culture", this ancient agricultural technique is used to construct garden beds from decaying wood debris and other compostable biomass plant materials. The process helps to improve soil fertility, water retention, and soil warming, thus benefiting plants grown on or near such mounds.
Event
Sun, Mar 11, 2018 - 12:00 pm
until 3:00 pm
Mary's stewardship goals are for diversity and support of habitat for wildlife. Learn the techniques she uses to support diverse birds and mammals including bear, bobcat and cougar. Bring snacks, experience, questions, answers, and binoculars if desired. 

 
Event
Sat, Feb 17, 2018 - 10:00 am
until 2:00 pm
Liz Crain will teach about setting and shaping hedges to cultivate edge space and natural boundaries on the landscape. We'll talk about tools, techniques, the cultural and historical importance of hedges, and species to select for your hedgerow. Please bring your own lunch and dress for the weather! 

 
Article
Introduction

Shiitake mushrooms (Lentinula edodes) are grown around the globe. Their rich texture, smoky flavor, and nutritious components have made them the second most commonly cultivated edible mushroom in the world and captured our taste buds. Originally cultivated by the Japanese, the name shiitake is composed of shii, for the Japanese chinquapin (Castanopsis cuspidate), the species of choice for growing shiitake mushrooms in Japan, and take meaning mushroom.
Article
Over ten years ago, sitting on a truck tailgate at a forest management workshop, the wife of a woodland owner said, “you know what? We need our own group, one where women of all skill levels feel comfortable sharing and learning from each other!”
Article
Oregon WOW member Marti Willis bravely shares her heartbreaking story of losing her land so that we all can avoid the same pitfalls.
Article
For us the decision to have a conservation easement on our forestland seemed like a no-brainer, but when we started analyzing all the aspects—-what we call all the “what-ifs”—-we knew we needed more time to make a decision. Once we took that time, we got all tangled in those possibilities. It was incredibly difficult to sort through emotions, thoughts, facts, and possibilities.
Article
Income Tax Deduction on Timber and Landscape Tree Loss from Casualty

Timber or landscape trees destroyed by the hurricane, fire, earthquake, ice, hail, tornado, and other storms are “casualty losses” that may allow the property owners to take a deduction on their federal income tax returns.
Article
Success looks like...
She had lost her husband two years before. He was always the one to do the forest management stuff while she managed horses! Now she was left without a clue of how she should manage the forest. Her plan was to just - let it be. Accompanying her friend who invited her on an informal Oregon WOWNet hike changed everything and left her in tears of relief. After talking with women on the hike who are managing forests on their own, she said she felt like she could do it too. She instantly felt she had a support network and a huge barrier was lifted. It’s amazing what a walk in the woods, with peers, can do!
Article
My mom called our forestland in northern Idaho a “spot of paradise.” Mom was the first to point out a grand fir that might fall, to see a moose on the pasture, and to notice Western larch needles changing color. She passed away eight years ago, and we try to honor her by caring for our forestland. Since my brother and I live far away, all of the work falls on Dad.
Article
Author:  Nicole Strong, Extension Forester, Deschutes/Crook/Jefferson/Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs

 
Event
Sat, Apr 21, 2018 - 10:00 am
until 2:00 pm
Let's take a moment to deconstruct the green wall of vegetation which grows abundantly all around. What can you eat? What medicine grows right outside the front door? In the Spring, there are so many fresh young shoots and leaves to learn about in this afternoon of shared discovery; come take a walk and find a sweet or bitter snack!
Event
Sat, Mar 17, 2018 - 10:00 am
until 2:00 pm
“Who-ga-culture.”  Who the what?! German for "mound or hill culture", this ancient agricultural technique is used to construct garden beds from decaying wood debris and other compostable biomass plant materials. The process helps to improve soil fertility, water retention, and soil warming, thus benefiting plants grown on or near such mounds.