Finding Assistance

Article
brought to you by the Virginia Forestry Association!
Article
One of the first retreats was attended by a woman named Norma Dale Smith. Norma had had close ties to family land since she was a little girl, and now her grandchildren were getting involved. Inspired from the retreat, Norma gathered all her stories from the land, put them into book form, and published the book to give to her children and grandchildren. Even while she was learning more about managing the land, Norma was also continuing to forge a connection to the land for herself and her family. Norma’s books have been printed and shared with participants at the WOW workshops.
Article
Success looks like...
She had lost her husband two years before. He was always the one to do the forest management stuff while she managed horses! Now she was left without a clue of how she should manage the forest. Her plan was to just - let it be. Accompanying her friend who invited her on an informal Oregon WOWNet hike changed everything and left her in tears of relief. After talking with women on the hike who are managing forests on their own, she said she felt like she could do it too. She instantly felt she had a support network and a huge barrier was lifted. It’s amazing what a walk in the woods, with peers, can do!
Article
Guest Post provided by Eli Roberts of the Pinchot Institute for Conservation

Forests are always changing. Most trees grow larger each year; some die. Seeds spread in many ways, and they become new trees, or food for other creatures. Weather changes across days, seasons, and years. It has always made sense to keep these changes in mind as you consider how to best manage your woods. But climate change complicates this variability, even as it makes managing forests more important.
Article
by Nia Becker, Clare Conservation District, Michigan
Event
Thu, Sep 6, 2018 - 4:00 pm
until 3:00 pm
The Women and Their Woods Educational Retreat is an in-depth, fun, engaging, and thought-provoking workshop on caring for your woodlands now and into the future. No matter the size of your woodlands or if you’re not yet an owner, join us for four days and three nights of learning, networking, and applying new knowledge about good forest stewardship. Learn more about Women and Their Woods.
Event
Sat, May 19, 2018 - 8:15 am
until 3:00 pm
This session is being offered as part of the 7th annual Loving the Land through Working Forests conference on Saturday, May 19 near Girard Township, Pennsylvania.

For more information and to register for the event, please visit: https://www.foundationforsustainableforests.org/loving-the-land.
Event
Tue, Oct 17, 2017 - 7:00 pm
until 9:00 pm
Location: Taste of India, 2570 Cleveland Ave., St. Paul (Roseville); 651-631-1222

Topics: MyMinnesotaWoods and UMN Master Woodland Owner Program: http://mwop.umn.edu/. The Master Woodland Owner program delivers a comprehensive training curriculum for private woodland owners interested in becoming better stewards of their woods. 

RSVP by October 16 to [email protected] 
Article
 

by Jarrett Caston, US Forest Service Program Specialist

Ms. Rebecca Campbell is a woman in South Carolina who owns 36 acres of heirs’ property. Heirs’ property is land passed down without a will. Ms. Campbell didn’t know that she owned heirs’ property until after her mother’s death in 1998. In addition to Ms. Campbell, about 50 or more family members share ownership, as family heirs, with Ms. Campbell.
Article
Thinking about a timber harvest? Depending on the size of the cut and the quality of the trees, you might want to consider hiring a portable sawmill to come turn your logs into usable lumber.
Event
Sat, Apr 29, 2017 - 8:30 am
until 4:30 pm
Women and our Woods is teaming up with Women of the Maine Outdoors to offer an action-packed workshop for women woodland owners and outdoor enthusiasts! Join us Saturday, April 29 at Pine Tree Camp in Rome, Maine for engaging, hands-on classes in a variety of forest-based topics.
Article
brought to you by the Virginia Forestry Association!
Article
One of the first retreats was attended by a woman named Norma Dale Smith. Norma had had close ties to family land since she was a little girl, and now her grandchildren were getting involved. Inspired from the retreat, Norma gathered all her stories from the land, put them into book form, and published the book to give to her children and grandchildren. Even while she was learning more about managing the land, Norma was also continuing to forge a connection to the land for herself and her family. Norma’s books have been printed and shared with participants at the WOW workshops.
Article
Success looks like...
She had lost her husband two years before. He was always the one to do the forest management stuff while she managed horses! Now she was left without a clue of how she should manage the forest. Her plan was to just - let it be. Accompanying her friend who invited her on an informal Oregon WOWNet hike changed everything and left her in tears of relief. After talking with women on the hike who are managing forests on their own, she said she felt like she could do it too. She instantly felt she had a support network and a huge barrier was lifted. It’s amazing what a walk in the woods, with peers, can do!
Article
Guest Post provided by Eli Roberts of the Pinchot Institute for Conservation

Forests are always changing. Most trees grow larger each year; some die. Seeds spread in many ways, and they become new trees, or food for other creatures. Weather changes across days, seasons, and years. It has always made sense to keep these changes in mind as you consider how to best manage your woods. But climate change complicates this variability, even as it makes managing forests more important.
Article
by Nia Becker, Clare Conservation District, Michigan
Event
Thu, Sep 6, 2018 - 4:00 pm
until 3:00 pm
The Women and Their Woods Educational Retreat is an in-depth, fun, engaging, and thought-provoking workshop on caring for your woodlands now and into the future. No matter the size of your woodlands or if you’re not yet an owner, join us for four days and three nights of learning, networking, and applying new knowledge about good forest stewardship. Learn more about Women and Their Woods.