Ties to the Land

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Guest Post By Phyllis Ridge, forest landowner and 2012 WaTW Retreat graduate
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It’s likely you have children, perhaps grandchildren, and it’s probable that you own forest land too. If you wish your offspring to have some attachment to that land, if you expect them to care for it as you do when you turn it over to them, begin now!
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I am so grateful during this season of blessings that my mom took the time over many years to speak with Dad and me about her deep love of our family forestland, her concerns about the forest, her desires for habitat renewal and stewardship, and her vision and goals. I am so grateful she and Dad planned for Mom’s passage by creating a trust, consulting a lawyer, creating a solid will, and communicating directly with me.
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On a colorful fall weekend in October 2011, twenty-one women landowners headed out to Camp Susque in Trout Run, PA for the inaugural Women and Their Woods Educational Retreat.
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Join women forest landowners for a educational weekend event. Participants will learn about cost share plans, tree planting, and invasive plant control. Women and Their Woods is a network of forest landowners and professionals working together to cultivate women’s connections to and care of healthy forests.
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Sat, Oct 22, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 3:00 pm
October 14th - registration deadline
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by Taimur Ahmad and Paul Sanford, The Wilderness Society

As the owner of a woodland, you are likely familiar with the recreational value of forests, from hiking, to hunting and fishing, to just admiring Fall colors.  State and national public lands offer people a chance to get outside and experience the benefits and beauty of nature – and by opening your woodland to recreation, you can as well. 
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Oregon WOW member Marti Willis bravely shares her heartbreaking story of losing her land so that we all can avoid the same pitfalls.
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Let’s be honest.  No one wants to think about their own death.  However, if we flip the thinking, we can focus on how we help our loved ones in that transition period.  It is important to think about what will happen to your land in the future.  After investing heart, soul (and probably money) in your property, doesn’t it make sense to plan for a transition of that property to the next generation or to an organization of your choice? 
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Fri, Oct 7, 2016 - 9:30 am
until 4:00 pm
Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska, MN
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For us the decision to have a conservation easement on our forestland seemed like a no-brainer, but when we started analyzing all the aspects—-what we call all the “what-ifs”—-we knew we needed more time to make a decision. Once we took that time, we got all tangled in those possibilities. It was incredibly difficult to sort through emotions, thoughts, facts, and possibilities.